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22

Apr

Reminder: Seminar on Hapa Japan Remix [Saturday 4/26]

Join us this Saturday!
April 26, 2014

Sawyer Seminar X
HAPA JAPAN REMIX

Co-sponsored by the CJRC Hapa Japan Database Project and Kaya Press

10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
East Asian Seminar Room (110C)
Doheny Memorial Library, USC

Summary:
How does a multiethnic location like Los Angeles provide the contours for mixed race individuals and community formations? How does dislocation - across the Pacific Ocean - inform multiracial experiences? And how does religion either inform or provide an alternative to race and mixed race as a framework for identity formation?

**Visit here for a full list of panels.**

**RSVP to cjrc@dornsife.usc.edu, thank you!**


Presented by the Center for Japanese Religions and Culture’s "Critical Mixed-Race Studies: A Transpacific Approach" Andrew W. Mellon Foundation John E. Sawyer Seminars Series at the University of Southern California.

Reminder: Symposium on the Future of Japan’s Immigration Policy [Friday 4/25]

Join us this Friday!
April 25, 2014


CJRC Hybrid Japan Project
Immigration Nation Japan? - Immigration Policy, Immigrant Integration, and the Future of Multiethnic Japan

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Room 351/352
Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC), USC

Featuring a keynote speech by Hidenori Sakanaka, former director of the Tokyo Immigration Bureau and current director of the Japan Immigration Policy Institute, this symposium explores the future of Japan’s immigration policy.

Description:
Japan’s declining population demographics has recently been increasingly recognized as not only an issue that affects the future of Japan’s workforce, but its taxation, pension, and health care futures. As Japan contemplates a more open immigration policy to address this imbalance, this symposium features the foremost experts on a Japanese-style immigration policy who will discuss the challenges to immigrant integration and how Japan might learn from other nations like South Korea and the U.S. to create a more multiethnic Japan.

**Visit here for full event schedule.**

**RSVP to cjrc@dornsife.usc.edu, thank you!**

UCLA Event on Japan’s “Abenomics” [Thursday 4/24]

Retooling Expectations
Presented by Annelise Riles, Anthropology, Cornell University (with Hirokazu Miyazaki)

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Thursday, April 24th
Room 352, Haines Hall
375 Portola Plaza, UCLA
Los Angeles, CA 90095


In April of this year, Japan’s right wing government and its allies at the Bank of Japan, Japan’s central bank, unleashed a bold new experiment that has rocked and energized markets around the world—“Abenomics”. We analyze this singular event as a performance of what we term “retooling”: an event that is produced by and produces the redeployment of tools and techniques that have already exhausted themselves in experts’ own perception, in ways that enable new kinds of relations with the market itself. Seen through this lens, Abenomics, and its implications for both financial stability and far-right nationalist politics, is best understood through longstanding anthropological insights about the nature of exchange.


Hear Annelise Riles speak as part of the Culture, Power, and Social Change series by the UCLA Department of Anthropology

Her Bio: http://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/faculty/bio.cfm?id=62
Her Blog: http://collateralknowledge.com/blog/

**Co-Sponsored with UCLA Anthropology

17

Apr

Paid! Summer Internships @ the Japanese American National Museum

Deadline to apply is Friday, May 2nd for all internships!

16

Apr

Workshop on Approaches to Study of Wartime Japan [Saturday 5/3]

Saturday
May 3, 2014

CJRC Religion, Modernity, and Science in Japan Project
Approaches to Wartime Japan: Militarism, Fascism & Religion

10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

East Asian Seminar Room (110C)
Doheny Memorial Library, USC

image


At this workshop, a group of scholars will discuss recent developments in the study of wartime Japan, bringing together perspectives from cultural history, the study of ideology, intellectual history and religion.

**Visit here for more details and list of presenters.**

Celebrating Vinayak Bharne’s latest book on Japanese Architecture and Urbanism [Thursday 5/1]

Thursday
May 1, 2014


CJRC Book Launch Event

Zen Spaces and Neon Places: Reflections on Japanese Architecture and Urbanism by Vinayak Bharne

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Room 241
Doheny Memorial Library, USC

image


A celebration of the latest book by Vinayak Bharne, Adjunct Associate Professor of Urbanism, Sol Price School of Public Policy, and Associated Faculty Member of the USC Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religions and Culture. Please join us!

**Visit here for more details.**

Sawyer Seminar: Hapa Japan Remix [Saturday 4/26]

Saturday
April 26, 2014

Sawyer Seminar X
HAPA JAPAN REMIX

Co-sponsored by the CJRC Hapa Japan Database Project and Kaya Press

10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
East Asian Seminar Room (110C)
Doheny Memorial Library, USC

image

Summary:
How does a multiethnic location like Los Angeles provide the contours for mixed race individuals and community formations? How does dislocation - across the Pacific Ocean - inform multiracial experiences? And how does religion either inform or provide an alternative to race and mixed race as a framework for identity formation?

**Visit here for a full list of panels.**

**RSVP to cjrc@dornsife.usc.edu, thank you!**


Presented by the Center for Japanese Religions and Culture’s "Critical Mixed-Race Studies: A Transpacific Approach" Andrew W. Mellon Foundation John E. Sawyer Seminars Series at the University of Southern California.

Symposium on the Future of Japan’s Immigration Policy [Friday 4/25]

Friday
April 25, 2014


CJRC Hybrid Japan Project
Immigration Nation Japan? - Immigration Policy, Immigrant Integration, and the Future of Multiethnic Japan

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Room 351/352
Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC), USC


image

Featuring a keynote speech by Hidenori Sakanaka, former director of the Tokyo Immigration Bureau and current director of the Japan Immigration Policy Institute, this symposium explores the future of Japan’s immigration policy.

Description:
Japan’s declining population demographics has recently been increasingly recognized as not only an issue that affects the future of Japan’s workforce, but its taxation, pension, and health care futures. As Japan contemplates a more open immigration policy to address this imbalance, this symposium features the foremost experts on a Japanese-style immigration policy who will discuss the challenges to immigrant integration and how Japan might learn from other nations like South Korea and the U.S. to create a more multiethnic Japan.

**Visit here for full event schedule.**

**RSVP to cjrc@dornsife.usc.edu, thank you!**

09

Apr

Lecture Reminder: Religious Piety, Ritual, and the Performing Arts in Japan [Friday 4/11]

CJRC Religion and Social Life in Premodern Japan Project
Religious Piety, Ritual, and the Performing Arts in Japan: Cultural Exchange with East Asia, Historically and Today

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Friday, April 11, 2014
East Asian Seminar Room (110C)
Doheny Memorial Library (DML), University Park Campus

**Please RSVP to cjrc@dornsife.usc.edu**

Summary:

Lecture by Professor Koichi Matsuo of the National Museum of Japanese History. **Please note: this lecture will be in JAPANESE only.**

Description:

In Japanese religions, both historically and today, the influence of Buddhism introduced from the Chinese continent (including the Korean peninsula) during the ancient period has been extremely great. This continental Buddhism fused with Japan’s ancient kami rites and practices, creating unique religious forms and cults. Cultural transmissions from China did not come to an end during the ancient period but continued during the medieval and early modern periods, and it was under such influence that the Buddhist culture of each period emerged. Things that are often introduced as unique aspects of Japanese culture—the way of tea (chado); the arts of flower arrangement; theater forms such as noh, kyogen, bunraku, joruri puppet theater, and kabuki; even the festivals that mark the four seasons—bear signs of Chinese, and especially Buddhist influence. They underwent a unique process of reception in Japan, and many continue even to this day, receiving not only local and domestic recognition, but in many cases also receiving UNESCO recognition as world cultural treasures or items of cultural heritage. In many ways the significance of this transmitted culture is difficult to understand using historical documents. But it is possible to physically experience such culture through its music, song, dance, and other embodied forms.

In this lecture Prof. Matsuo will introduce some of the films he has produced, films that document aspects of this ongoing cultural exchange between Japan and the Chinese continent. He will also consider the unique aspects of festivals and performative arts in Japan, both of which carry strong religious or cultic elements.

Dr. Koichi Matsuo is a Professor in the Research Department of the National Museum of Japanese History (Rekihaku) in Chiba, Japan.

Lecture Reminder: The Origins of Soka Gakkai [Monday 4/14]

CJRC Lecture Series
The Origins of Soka Gakkai: Tracing the Transformation of an Educational Reform Society into Japan’s Largest Religious Organization

by Levi McLaughlin
Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Monday, April 14, 2014
East Asian Seminar Room (110C)
Doheny Memorial Library (DML), University Park Campus

**Please RSVP to cjrc@dornsife.usc.edu**

Soka Gakkai, literally the “Value Creation Study Association,” is a lay organization rooted in Nichiren Buddhism that rose in the postwar era to become the largest religious organization in Japan, and most likely the largest religious group in Japanese history. Perhaps ironically, Japan’s largest religion did not begin as a religion at all but instead started in the 1930s as a small collective of schoolteachers and intellectuals committed to educational reform. Drawing on rare primary sources and interviews with veteran adherents, this presentation will trace Soka Gakkai’s foundation and will identify crucial points in its development by discussing how its twin legacies of medieval Japanese Buddhism and modern humanism conflated within the group’s practices – such as youth training, cultural activities, and political mobilization. Analysis of Soka Gakkai’s remarkable transformation into a religious mass movement will reveal distinctive aspects of “New Religions” that take shape in the context of modern nation-states.

This talk comprises portions of Prof. Mclaughlin’s forthcoming book Soka Gakkai: Buddhism and Romantic Heroism in Modern.

**This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided!**